Across the United States, young men of color face significant hurdles to educational and economic success, and education leaders are taking action to address the fact that African-American and Latino males do not enjoy the same outcomes as their peers.

DC Public Schools is taking a stand with the Empowering Males of Color initiative. Launched in January 2015 with the support of Mayor Bowser and city business leaders, the Empowering Males of Color initiative devotes significant resources and attention to accelerating African-American and Latino male student achievement, ensuring all young men in our nation’s capital can realize their full potential.

$5 MILLION INVESTMENT NEED


SUPPORTING DCPS' YOUNGEST MALES OF COLOR
$248K OVER 1 YEAR

The Empowering Males of Color initiative focuses on male students of all grade levels, and currently includes a pilot program designed to support the school-readiness and success of DCPS’ pre-Kindergarten boys of color. In collaboration with the Office of Head Start and the National Center on Cultural and Linguistic Responsiveness at Bank Street College of Education, this program trains early childhood educators in a culturally-responsive, strengths-based framework.

Funding will expand the program to 11 new schools.

DCPS' FIRST ALL-MALE HIGH SCHOOL
$300k REMAINING TO RAISE

In School Year 2016-2017, DCPS will open Ron Brown College Preparatory High School, the district’s first-ever all-male public high school. Located in Ward 7, this new school will offer a high-quality, college-preparatory education that positions its graduates to succeed in college.

As of May 2016, DC Ed Fund has raised $570K toward the original $870K investment goal. An additional $300K will support the second cohort of students’ Summer Bridge program and professional development focused on empowerment and single-gender education.

EMPOWERING MALES OF COLOR
INNOVATION GRANTS

$3.3M REMAINING TO RAISE

The Empowering Males of Color Innovation Grants provide schools with resources to address the specific needs of their African-American and Latino male students.

In January 2016, DC Ed Fund launched the first round of these two-year grants. Grant-funded programs are focused in one of three areas proven to positively impact the academic outcomes of young men of color: social and emotional well-being, community and family engagement, or academic enrichment.

Additional funding will enable DC Ed Fund to award innovation grants to many more schools in the 2016-2017 school year and beyond.